Managing Covid-19 and other epidemics in prisons and places of detention

Call for papers for: International Journal of Prisoner Health

This special issue of International Journal of Prisoner Health will focus on issues surrounding Covid-19 in order to raise awareness of the important issue of managing epidemics in closed environments, such as prisons, police detention, and other criminal justice agencies.

We welcome submissions from all disciplines, not only from social sciences but also health, social care, human rights, law and related fields. The WHO has already provided guidance about management of the COVID-19 virus in detention:


People deprived of their liberty, such as people in prisons and other places of detention   likely to be more vulnerable to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak than the general population because of the confined conditions in which they live together for prolonged periods of time. Moreover, experience shows that prisons, jails and similar settings where people are gathered in close proximity may act as a source of infection, amplification and spread of infectious diseases within and beyond prisons. Prison health is therefore widely considered as public health. The response to COVID-19 in prisons and other places of detention is particularly challenging, requiring a whole-of-government and whole-of-society approach.

(WHO, 2020, Preparedness, prevention and control of COVID-19 in prisons and other places of detention Interim guidance 15 March 2020)
 

Topics covered include (but are not limited to):

  • People more likely to be vulnerable to COVID-19 in prisons and other places of detention in the context of living in confined conditions for prolonged periods.
  • Prisons, jails and similar settings where people are gathered in close proximity that may act as a source of infection, amplification and spread of infectious diseases within and beyond prisons.


IJPH is open to data-driven or theoretical submissions that contribute to our understanding of the key issues caused by the management of epidemics like Covid-19.

IJPH offers a forum for research, policy and opinion on the challenges facing closed environments such as prisons, mental health closed institutions and police detention.

Articles for the special issue should have a well-articulated theme that reflect, at an international level, the best work in epidemic management in closed institutions.

IJPH is keen to ensure that the special issue contains contributions of researchers from a number of different countries that address the issue at hand.

All submissions will be subject to double-blind peer review and will be assessed according to the following criteria:

  • Suitability of the submission for the special issue
  • Overall quality of the article: originality and contribution to the field
  • Theoretical background and rationale
  • Methodological adequacy (if appropriate)
  • Clarity and significance of the results
  • Quality of discussion and conclusions.

The maximum length of a paper is 7-8,000 words (including references, tables and figures). The peer review of submissions will be expedited by an expert steering group for the special issue.

Deadline and Submission Details

The submission deadline for all papers is 30th September 2020
The publication date of this special issue is early 2021
To submit your research, please visit the manuscript portal

Interested authors should select (from the drop-down menu) the special issue “Managing Covid-19 and other epidemics in prisons and places of detention” at the appropriate step in the submission process, i.e. in response to “Please select the issue you are submitting to”

To view the author guidelines for this journal, please visit the journal's page.

Contact the editors
Please do not hesitate to contact the journal’s editorial team if you have any questions about a submission.
Contact should be made via the Journal’s Managing Editor, David Kane, Birmingham City University, UK; Email: [email protected]


Steering Group

Penelope Abbott, Western Sydney University, Australia
Cyrus Ahalt, UCSF Department of Medicine, USA
Michelle Baybutt , University of Central Lancashire, UK
Robert Greifinger, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, City University of New York, USA
Fabienne Hariga, Independent Consultant 
Laura Hammond, Birmingham City University, UK
David Kane, Birmingham City University, UK
Morag MacDonald, Birmingham City University, UK
Rose Mhlanga, University of Zimbabwe, Africa
Roberto Monarca, Health Without Barriers, Italy  
Linda Montanari, European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug, Portugal
Eamonn O’Moore, Public Health England, UK
Emma Plugge, Public Health England, UK
Sunita Stürup-Toft, Public Health England, UK
Marie Claire Van Hout , Liverpool John Moores University, UK
Ron Winch, Birmingham City University, UK