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The Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030 – Challenges and opportunities


Guest Edited by
Professor Virginia Murray, Vice-Chair, UNISDR Science and Technical Advisory Group & Public Health England
Professor Dilanthi Amaratunga and Professor Richard Haigh, Global Disaster Resilience Centre, University of Huddersfield, UK

Background

Papers from the research community are invited to this agenda setting themed issue on how we can best respond to the challenges and opportunities set out in the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030.

While some progress in building resilience and reducing losses and damages has been achieved, a substantial reduction of disaster risk requires perseverance and persistence, with a more explicit focus on people and their health and livelihoods, and regular follow-up. Building on the Hyogo Framework for Action, the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030  aims to achieve “The substantial reduction of disaster risk and losses in lives, livelihoods and health and in the economic, physical, social, cultural and environmental assets of persons, businesses, communities and countries” over the next 15 years.

Taking into account the experience gained through the implementation of the Hyogo Framework for Action, and in pursuance of the expected outcome and goal, there is a need for focused action within and across sectors by States at local, national, regional and global levels in the following four priority areas:

1. Understanding disaster risk;
2. Strengthening disaster risk governance to manage disaster risk;
3. Investing in disaster risk reduction for resilience;
4. Enhancing disaster preparedness for effective response, and to “Build Back Better” in recovery, rehabilitation and reconstruction.

In the context of increasing global interdependence, concerted international cooperation, an enabling international environment and means of implementation are needed to stimulate and contribute to developing the knowledge, capacities and motivation for disaster risk reduction at all levels, in particular for developing countries.

This Framework makes a strong call for science to support the understanding of disaster risk and to promote risk-informed decisions and risk sensitive planning from the local to the global levels. It also calls for the coordination of existing networks and scientific research institutions.  The goal is to strengthen the evidence-base in support of the implementation of the new framework. If we want to continue to deepen our understanding of evolving risks, the root causes of disasters and their impact on development, we need actionable research that is useful, usable and used.

The success of the post-2015 framework hinges on creating and implementing policies that are built on the best available knowledge. Academia, scientific and research entities and networks need to: focus on the disaster risk factors and scenarios, including emerging disaster risks, in the medium and long term; increase research for regional, national and local application; support action by local communities and authorities; and support the interface between policy and science for decision-making. 

Contents of the themed issue:

For this themed issue, the Editors invite  papers that consider how we can best respond to the challenges and opportunities set out in the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030. In common with the journal’s scope and coverage, contributions should address a built environment perspective, although multi-disciplinary perspectives are particularly welcome.

Accordingly, this issue will cover the following sub themes (but not limited to):
• Research directions. What focused action within and across sectors needs to be carried out in four priority areas: 1) Understanding disaster risk; 2) Strengthening disaster risk governance to manage disaster risk; 3) Investing in disaster risk reduction for resilience; 4) Enhancing disaster preparedness for effective response, and to “Build Back Better” in recovery, rehabilitation and reconstruction.
• Assessment. What Science can provide analytical tools to assess and advance our knowledge of hazard, risk, and underlying risk drivers?
• Synthesis. What can be done to facilitate the uptake of scientific evidence in policy-making?
• Scientific advice. What do we need to do to translate knowledge into solutions?
• Monitoring and review. How can the science and technology community support the development of science-based indicators, common methodologies and processes to harness data and information to promote their availability and use at different scales?
• Communication and engagement. How can we build closer partnerships between policy and research and between researchers themselves?
• Capacity building. How can we build capacity in taking forward the DRR agenda for the next 15 years?
High quality original papers are invited for the “The Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030 Challenges and opportunities”. All papers will be subjected to the journal’s double-blind peer review process.

Important deadlines

15th May 2015: Deadline for abstract submission
15th June 2015: Decision and call for full papers
15th September 2015: Full paper submission

Submissions

At this stage, we are calling for abstracts (200 words) with the proposed title and up to three key words. These will be reviewed against the themed Issue scope, and IJDRBE’s aim and objectives. Relevant authors will then be asked to submit full papers. The themed issue editors are Professor Virginia Murray, Professor Dilanthi Amaratunga & Professor Richard Haigh. Virginia is the Vice-chair, UNISDR Science and Technical Advisory Group (STAG)  & Public Health England and a key champion of the Science and Technical Advisory Group.  Dilanthi and Richard are the Editors of the International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment who are also members of the Science and Technical Group of the UNISDR.  They are also the Steering committee members of the UNIDR Making Cities Resilient Campaign.

Any queries on this themed issue and your abstracts to be submitted to Professor Dilanthi Amaratunga ([email protected] ) at the Global Disaster Resilience Centre, University of Huddersfield, UK.

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment (IJDRBE) and the United Nations Science and Technology Major Group

The International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, the United Nations Science and Technology Major Group, and the UNISDR Science and Technical Advisory Group are working together to share knowledge and solutions to address disaster risk and build resilience, and how we can best respond to the challenges and opportunities set out in the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030.

The journal publishes original and refereed material that contributes to the advancement of the research and practice, and provides contributing authors with an opportunity to disseminate their research and experience to a broad audience. It is indexed in prestigious indexing services including SCOPUS.

The Journal is edited by Professors Dilanthi Amaratunga & Richard Haigh from the Global Disaster Resilience Centre at the University of Huddersfield, UK. Please visit www.emeraldinsight.com/ijdrbe.htm to read more about the Journal. 

Further details on Global Disaster Resilience Centre is available at: http://www.hud.ac.uk/research/researchcentres/gdrc/

References
1 Representatives from 187 UN member States adopted the Post-2015 development agenda, a new framework for disaster risk reduction with seven targets and four priorities for action at the UN World Conference held in March 2015 in Sendai, Japan.
2 Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030
3 Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030
4 Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030