This page is older archived content from an older version of the Emerald Publishing website.

As such, it may not display exactly as originally intended.

Neo-liberalism and social justice in post-compulsory education and training


Special issue call for papers from Education + Training

 

Call for papers

Proposal for special issue of Education and Training: neo-liberalism and social justice in post-compulsory education and training

Guest editors:
Dr Vicky Duckworth, Edge Hill University UK [[email protected]]
And
Dr Jonathan Tummons, Durham University UK [[email protected]]

The model of Curriculum can determine whether education is an emancipating or suppressing process. Therefore, the lifelong curriculum may be situated not as neutral or apolitical but at the centre of educational power. For example in an age of globalisation and neoliberalism, it may be viewed as a product of market driven changes, where approaches to, for example Skills for Life involve a functional Literacy approach. This is defined by its social purposes, in which there is an alignment between individual skills, the performance of society, the global economy and economic productivity. This edition Special Education of Education and Training asks what kinds of curricula are found in post-compulsory education and training, and how do they conform or / and offer resistance to neo-liberal discourses within organisation?  In what respect do policies, organisational contexts and cultures shape opportunities for challenging dominant discourses and offer critical spaces for more emancipatory approaches to pedagogy that contribute to social justice and challenge structural inequalities, such as class, gender and ethnicity, in post-compulsory education and training?

The guest editors would be pleased to receive inquiries and submissions via email, relating to the broad theme of neo-liberalism and social justice in post-compulsory education and training (including further and adult education, and vocational and professional education) by 31 December 2013. Suitable topics for papers might include (but are not necessarily restricted to):

• The impact of neo-liberal discourses on pedagogical practices
• The enactment of, and resistance to, neo-liberal political discourses in post-compulsory education and education
• Critical perspectives on social justice in post-compulsory education and training
• Practitioner perspectives on social justice in post-compulsory education and training
• Pedagogical responses to social justice and community engagement

Prospective authors are also recommended to check the journal website for specific notes relating to style, academic conventions etc.