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GOVERNMENT AT RISK: cyber-security, cyber-threat, propaganda, and government

Special issue call for papers from Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy

GOVERNMENT AT RISK: cyber-security, cyber-threat, propaganda, and government

Guest Editors:

·         Dr Akila Sarirete, Effat University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

·         Dr Anna Visvizi, Deree College -The American College of Greece, Athens, Greece

·         Dr Miltiadis D. Lytras, Deree College – The American College of Greece, Athens, Greece

 

THE FOCUS AND THE RATIONALE OF THE SPECIAL ISSUE

Sophisticated information and communication technology (ICT) creates opportunities for our societies. However, it also contributes to the emergence of several risks and challenges. To a certain extent, the perceived scope, scale and implications ICT exert on our societies are a source of fear and confusion among stakeholders. Indeed, amidst insufficient knowledge of and understanding about ICT, the debate on ICT and its impact on our societies is one of the hottest debates of today. Still, apart from several exceptions, it is driven largely by news outlets and think-tanks. Since, as a result, conceptual zeal and thorough concept-driven reflection are missing in that debate, it is imperative that the voice of academia becomes more pronounced in it. The objective of this Special Issue is to do just that.

THE CONTEXT & AIMS

Contrary to hopes expressed by the late 20th century thinkers (Fukuyama, 1992), in the 21st century a sense of uncertainty and justifiable fear prevails. Populism, extremism, uncertain outcomes of elections, partisanship politics, breaches of security, cyber-warfare, cyber-crime, wars, fears of climate change, all suggest that things might be getting out of control. Simultaneously, the value and the future of democratic and liberal order are openly contested. Generational change exerts its impact too. In brief, since – in absence of a valid alternative -- the spirit of Westphalia continues to define the basic logic of interaction in the world, the developments listed above indicate that the government might actually be at risk. Advances in ICT might be the key culprit here.

Hence, even if substantial literature on the role of the government certainly exists, this Special Issue seeks to add to this discussion by exploring the intersection between the government and ICT as it unfolds. In this way, this Special Issue hopes to showcase not only how the government is challenged, but also how much of its capacity is left idle. By organizing but a part of the debate, this Special Issue also seeks to outline a conceptual and empirical framework that will enable us to capture and reflect on the role of the government today.

AIMS & SCOPE

The aim of this Special Issue is to put the government and ICT in spotlight and to showcase not only how the government is challenged, but also how much of its capacity is left idle.  Specifically, this Special Issue aims to provide conceptual and empirical insights into the relationship between the government and ICT. This may include issues as straightforward as digitalization of certain functions of the government, including the provision of key services to citizens; the impact of the Big Data paradigm on government functions and policy-making. However, it can also include issues more complex, such as cyber-security, propaganda, elections, e-democracy, as well as multilateralism and pressures it endures as the role of the government is challenged.

Indicative list of topics:

The Editors of this Special Issue invite conceptually-sound and empirically driven papers that address, but are not limited to, the following issues:

·         digitalization of certain government functions and e-government, including e-diplomacy;

·         data-driven policy-making: prediction, strategy, foresight, application

·         cybersecurity, including the government's capacity to maintain the entire system/state apparatus intact in view of external risks and threats, while at the same time maintaining the capacity to collaborate with third actors, i.e. interoperability;

·         cybersafety, including the government's capacity to delivery effectively manage public space, also the virtual one;

·         social networking sites and democracy:  elections, propaganda, manipulation;

·         government capacity to do effective foresight and prediction

·         the role of international organizations in mediating and mitigating ICT-borne risks and challenges governments are exposed to;

·         newsliteracy and online education, including MOOCs addressing the issue;

·         regional focus and regional case studies, including, e.g. the EU;

Deadline and Submission Details:

The submission deadline for all papers is 15 January 2020.

Conference papers will be considered for publication in this Special Issue too.

To submit your research, please visit: https://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/tgppp

To view the author guidelines for this journal, please visit: http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelin…

Contact the Guest Editors:

Ø  Dr Akila Sarirete, Effat University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, email: [email protected]

Ø  Dr Anna Visvizi, Deree College -The American College of Greece, Athens, Greece, email: [email protected]

Ø  Dr Miltiadis D. Lytras, Deree College – The American College of Greece, Athens, Greece, email: [email protected]