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The Fourth Industrial Revolution (Industry 4.0): Technologies' Disruption on Operations and Supply Chain Management


The Fourth Industrial Revolution (Industry 4.0):  Technologies’ Disruption on Operations and Supply Chain Management

Special Issue Call for Papers from the
International Journal of Operations and Production Management

Guest Editors


Prof. Lenny Koh, The University of Sheffield, UK
Dr. Guido Orzes, Free University of Bozen-Bolzano, Italy
Prof. Fu (Jeff) Jia, University of York, UK

Background


During the last five years, journals in robotics, electronics, computer science, and production engineering have devoted significant attention to Industry 4.0 and related subjects, including additive manufacturing/3D printing, intelligent manufacturing, and big data (Lee et al., 2014; Xi et al., 2015; Pfeiffer et al., 2016; Mosterman and Zander, 2016; Chen and Zhang, 2015; Jia et al., 2016). A systematic literature review on Industry 4.0 or on some of its specific technologies (e.g., additive manufacturing) is provided by Liao et al. (2017), Strozzi et al. (2017), and Niaki and Nonino (2017) among others. Although prominent scholars have acknowledged the relevance of Industry 4.0 for management in general, as well as for Operations and Production Management (O&PM) specifically (Brennan et al., 2015; Fawcett and Waller, 2014; Holmström and Romme, 2012; Melnyk et al., 2018), relatively little consideration has been given to these topics by mainstream O&PM journals, especially on Industry 4.0 technologies’ disruption on operations and supply chain management. A few prominent exceptions are represented by the recent attempts to shed lights on (a) the link between Industry 4.0 and lean manufacturing (Bruer et al., 2018; Tortorella and Fettermann, 2018); (b) the link between internet of things and supply chain management (Ben-Daya et al., 2017); (c) the impact of additive manufacturing on supply chain processes and performances (Liu et al., 2014; Oettmeier and Hofmann, 2016; Li et al., 2017); (d) the short-term supply chain scheduling in smart factories (Ivanov et al., 2016).

While in the past there were very few pilot Industry 4.0 projects, the number of applications has significantly increased, both in terms of demonstration and “real” factories hence give rise to more empirical studies. Demonstration factories include Factory 2050 at the University of Sheffield (UK), Demonstration Factory at Aachen University (Germany), TRUMPF Group Factory in Chicago (USA), and SmartFactoryKL in Kaiserslautern (Germany), whilst “real” factories are at Audi’s Ingolstadt factory (Core77, 2016), Arla Foods (ARC, 2016), Siemens’ Amberg plant (Siemens, 2016), and Bosch’s Feuerbach plant in Stuttgart (Automotive World, 2016). A recent survey conducted by PwC on more than 2,000 companies from 26 countries showed an overall adoption rate of Industry 4.0 concepts (e.g., digitization and integration) of 33%, and forecasted that it will reach 72% by 2020 (PwC, 2015). This growth will be further fostered by the funding and innovation plans launched by several countries leading this industrial revolution, e.g., Manufacturing USA in the United States, Industrie du Futur in France, Industrie 4.0 in Germany, Industria 4.0 in Italy, Made in China 2025, Made Smarter UK. It is argued that different industrial sectors have different pace of adopting Industry 4.0. for instance, the aerospace sector has sometimes been characterised as "too low volume for extensive automation" however Industry 4.0 principles have been investigated by several aerospace companies, technologies have been developed to improve productivity where the upfront cost of automation cannot be justified, one example of this is the aerospace parts manufacturer Meggitt PLC's project, M4.

Here, the fourth industrial revolution (Industry 4.0) refers to the “confluence of technologies ranging from a variety of digital technologies (e.g. 3D printing, Internet of Things, advanced robotics) to new materials (e.g. bio or nano-based) to new processes (e.g. data driven production, Artificial Intelligence, synthetic biology)” (OECD, 2016). These technologies have the potential to revolutionise operations and supply chain management (Brennan et al., 2015; Holmström et al., 2016; Rüßmann et al., 2015; Fawcett and Waller, 2014; Waller and Fawcett, 2013). Industry 4.0 is not merely about integrating technologies, but it is about the whole concept of how future customer demands, resources and data are shared, owned, used, regenerated, exploited, organised and recycled to make a product or deliver a service, faster, cheaper, more efficiently and more sustainably (Spath, 2013). As such, Industry 4.0 requires a rethinking and shift in mindset of how products are manufactured and services are produced, distributed/supplied, sold and used in the supply chain; thus, it will drive significant structural theoretical evolution and revolution for operations and supply chain management. Whilst classical theories such as resource based view, institutional theory, chaos theory, systems theory, stakeholder theory, transaction economic cost theory, evolutionary theory to name a few may need reshaping, the issues of trust will become prominent in such a disruptive digital environment, driving major evolvement of technological singularity in the transformation process, where blockchain may play a central role with Internet of Things and Artificial Intelligence (Carter and Koh, 2018).

This Special Issue intends to advance the O&PM field through expanding the understanding of Industry 4.0 technologies’ disruption on operations and supply chain management evolution and revolution. This Special Issue investigates these challenges across multiple sectors and across different industries. The Industry 4.0 technological developments for operations and supply chain management to be considered (not limited to these) may include:
•    Cyber-physical systems (‘digital twin’)
•    Internet-of-Things (IoTs)
•    Machine learning and Artificial Intelligence (AI)
•    Advanced robotics (collaborative and adaptive robots)
•    Big data analytics
•    Cloud computing (software-as-a-service, platform-as-a-service, infrastructure-as-a-service)
•    Blockchain technology
•    Additive manufacturing, hybrid manufacturing, and 3d printing
•    Smart manufacturing
•    Autonomy (e.g. autonomous vehicles) and drones
•    Augmented reality (AR), virtual reality (VR) and mixed reality (MR) immersive technologies
Submitted papers should clearly demonstrate the relevance to operations management or supply chain management theory development.

Topic areas of interest

This Special Issue showcases the extent to which Industry 4.0 disrupts and transforms operations and supply chain management. Some of the pertinent areas of interests include:
•    The role of AI in resource flow management and decision making in operations and supply chain management from Industry 4.0.
•    The effects on productivity and efficiency from autonomy and robots in operations and supply chain management from Industry 4.0.
•    Supply chain transparency and sustainability performance with IoTs and Cloud services in Industry 4.0.
•    Fully automated end-to-end order fulfilment centre of the future with Industry 4.0.
•    New digital manufacturing/service models and new digital supply chain models from Industry 4.0.
•    The challenges in managing data interoperability and governance for operations and digital supply chains for the future from    Industry 4.0.
•    Operations and supply chains environmental impact from Industry 4.0.
•    The hybridization of physical and virtual operations and supply chain environments from Industry 4.0.
•    Big data and Internet payment to support operations and supply chain finance, risk and resource management from Industry 4.0.
•    Trust, automated operations, visibility and shortened supply chains from blockchain in Industry 4.0.
•    Industry 4.0 standards and platforms for operations and supply chain management.
•    The role of Industry 4.0 in business process integration for improved operations and supply chain management.
•    Smart manufacturing, machine and deep learning in operations and supply chains in Industry 4.0.
•    Resource efficiency and circular economy tracking in operations and supply chains with Industry 4.0.
•    Merging design and manufacturing or services for operations and supply chain management with immersive technologies in Industry 4.0.
•    Future business models (ownership vs usership) from additive manufacturing and services (including logistics and drones delivery); and from ‘uberization’ in Industry 4.0.
•    Data as a currency (as a resource) in Industry 4.0 for operations and digital supply chains of the future.

Types of papers to be published

In this Special Issue of the International Journal of Operations and Production Management, we welcome papers with strong theoretical and empirical underpinnings, supported by methodological advances and the disruptive effect of Industry 4.0 technologies on operations and supply chain management evolution and revolution. The theoretical constructs can be wide-ranging, but we particularly encourage advancing the aforementioned theoretical bases. We welcome papers, which are cross-disciplinary, but have clear and main contributions to the field of O&PM.
 
The full range of empirically based research methodologies in the O&PM context – including (but not limited to) questionnaire surveys, case studies, secondary data analysis (e.g., event study, panel data analysis) are welcome. Papers adopting mixed methodology are also welcome. However, pure modelling and simulation papers are out of scope.

Submission and review process

Submission process and papers must adhere to the normal author guidelines of the International Journal of Operations and Production Management, which can be found at http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=ijopm

Submission must be made via Manuscript Central https://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/ijopm with clear selection indicating that the submission is for this Special Issue.

Papers submitted to the Special Issue will be subjected to normal thorough double-blind review process.

Manuscript to be submitted to the guest editors by: 31/12/2018
First review outcome by: 31/03/2019
First revised manuscript to be submitted to the guest editors by: 30/06/2019
Second review outcome by: 31/07/2019
Second revised manuscript to be submitted to the guest editors by: 30/09/2019
Final decision outcome by: 31/10/2019

Accepted  papers would be online first around 30 days after acceptance

Special Issue Editorial Team


Professor SC Lenny Koh, The University of Sheffield: is a Chair Professor in Operations Management, Director of the Centre for Energy, Environment and Sustainability (CEES) and Advanced Resource Efficiency Centre (AREC), at The University of Sheffield, Management School, UK. She has over 343 publications (H index 54) in the forms of journal papers, books, edited books, edited proceedings, edited special issues, book chapters, conference papers, technical papers and reports. Her work appears in top quality and high impact journals such as International Journal of Operations and Production Management, International Journal of Production Research, Journal of The Operational Research Society, International Journal of Production Economics, OMEGA, Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, Production Planning and Control, Environmental Science and Technology, Renewable and Sustainable Energy Review, Energy and Environmental Science, Nature Plants and Nature Scientific Reports. Her large scale cross disciplinary research funded by EPSRC, ESRC, EU, Leverhulme Trust, Innovate UK, industry and government have led to new method, model, concept / thinking and tool. Her research has been translated into Microsoft Cloud technology (with big data and business intelligence analytics) powered software tools (SCEnAT suites) for supply chain resources management, which are used by industry from diverse sectors. She is a co-lead author of an influential concept paper ‘Blockchain Disruption on Transport: Are you decentralised yet?’ with the Transport Systems Catapult.

Dr. Guido Orzes, Free University of Bozen-Bolzano, Italy: is an Assistant Professor in Management Engineering at the Free University of Bozen-Bolzano (Italy). He is also Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Exeter Business School (UK). His research focuses on international sourcing and manufacturing and their social and environmental implications. He is involved (as work package leader or co-investigator) in various EU-funded projects on Industry 4.0 and digitalization, including SME 4.0 - Industry 4.0 for SME (Marie Skłodowska-Curie RISE) and A21Digital Tyrol Veneto (Interreg V-A Italia-Austria). Dr. Orzes has published in leading operations management and international business journals such as the International Journal of Operations and Production Management, the International Journal of Production Economics, the International Business Review, the Journal of Purchasing and Supply Management, and the Journal of Cleaner Production. He is Associate Editor of Electronic Journal of Business Research Methods and ad-hoc reviewer of many leading international journals (including International Journal of Operations and Production Management, Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, and Journal of Purchasing and Supply Management).

Professor Fu (Jeff) Jia, University of York: is a Chair Professor of Supply Chain Management at the York Management School, University of York, UK. His research interests include supply relationship management in a cross-cultural context, global sourcing, supply chain learning and innovation and sustainable supply management. Prof. Jia is currently leading a project team investigating the effects of 3D technologies on supply chain configuration funded by EPSRC. Prof. Jia has an extensive track record of publications in supply chain management and logistics journals as Journal of Operations Management, International Journal of Operations and Production Management, Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, International Journal of Production Economics, Journal of Business Logistics, International Business Review, Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Journal of Cleaner Production, Journal of Purchasing and Supply Management, and International Journal of Logistics Management among others. Prof. Jia is an Associate Editor of International Journal of Operations and Production Management and Journal of Purchasing and Supply Management, sits on the editorial review board of Industrial Marketing Management and serves as a regular reviewer for many leading journals such as British Journal of Management, Human Relations, Industrial Marketing Management, International Journal of Production Economics and International Business Review among others.

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