Entrepreneurship Activities Among the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) Enterprising Communities

Call for papers for: Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy

Open to submissions December 2021

 

Guest Editors:  

Shqipe Gerguri-Rashiti, American University of the Middle East, Kuwait; E-mail: [email protected]  

Ramo Palalic, Sultan Qaboos University, Oman; E-mail: [email protected]  

Jusuf Zeqiri, South East European University, North Macedonia; E-mail: [email protected] 

Vladimir Dzenopoljac, American University of the Middle East, Kuwait; E-mail: [email protected] 

Description 

The Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC), was established in 1981. The GCC is made up of six countries, the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA), the United Arab Emirates (UAE), Kuwait, Bahrain, Qatar, and the Sultanate of Oman. The main purpose of the GCC is to share common cultural values and benefits, which are based on Islamic beliefs. Free movement of people, goods, and capital ensured this region very fast development. The economy of these countries is dependent on world oil production and its prices. Recently, these countries recorded declines in their GDP due to decreases in oil prices. All currencies of the GCC members are pegged to the US Dollar (USD). Qatar has the highest GDP per capita (USD$59,324), the UAE (USD$37,622), Kuwait (USD$ 27,359), Bahrain ($22,579), the KSA (USD$20,028), and Oman has the least GDP per capita (USD$14,982).  

In the last few years, all countries began to base their budgets on the real economy, production and export. In order to do that, they promote education for locals which will allow them to take crucial positions in the economy from expatriates so that they can run their economies independently. The number of expatriates in these countries varies and the biggest number is in the KSA with approximately eight million. Additionally, the GCC’s governments promote entrepreneurship development across the countries. A huge amount of funds is available in each country to promote entrepreneurial activities. They have realised that dependence on oil is not a long-lasting solution. Their population should be involved in these processes, and thus respective governments support education throughout universities as well as via lifelong learning centres. Business incubators at universities or separate are being established.  

As the region lacks real sectors like production, the establishment of start-ups, small and medium enterprises (SMEs), and attraction of foreign direct investment (FDI) should be done. In view of this need, it would be worthwhile to outline the region from the perspective of its history and its values, the economy and current state of entrepreneurship as well as future prospects, for those who want to know more before investing in this region — this book will be of a great value to them. 

For entrepreneurs who are discovering the GCC for their prospective businesses, they must be familiar with the three principles that guide the local populations. Being aware of the environment in which businesspersons are in, they can establish a good base network for long-term success. According to some, the following are the main pillars: “family, Bedoinism and Islam”. In fact, all three factors contain very strong principles and none of them should be neglected. Family is first. Bedouinism has deep roots in overall Saudi Arabian culture that influences individuals and society on certain decisions that should be made. Islam has come after the time of Bedouinism, however, the Bedouin ethos is preserved and inherited along with Islamic teachings. Islam teaches all Muslims from a young age to be moral, fair, just and helpful to others. 

Both micro- and macro-level studies are welcome for the special issue. Quantitative, qualitative and mixed approaches are also welcome, so long as they are well grounded in the literature. Please refer to the following articles:  

  • Dana, L.P. & Dumez, H. (2015), Qualitative Research Revisited: Epistemology of a Comprehensive Approach, International Journal of Entrepreneurship & Small Business, 26 (2), 154-170.  

  • Dana, L.P. & Dana, T.E. (2005), Expanding the Scope of Methodologies Used in Entrepreneurship Research, International Journal of Entrepreneurship & Small Business, 2 (1), 79-88.  

 We also encourage writers to come forward with emerging and frame-breaking topics to diversify and widen research from the perspective of GCC countries. 

Subject Coverage 

Suitable topics include, but are not limited to, the following: 

  • Government support and GCC enterprising communities 

  • Gendered entrepreneurship in GCC communities 

  • Social entrepreneurship in GCC communities 

  • Small business in ethnic enclaves in GCC 

  • Religion and entrepreneurship 

  • Business education/teaching, ethics, values, social responsibility 

  • Cross-cultural management/marketing, cross-disciplinary business areas 

  • Informal and home-based self-employment in GCC communities 

  • Other

Notes for Prospective Authors 

Submitted papers should not have been previously published nor be currently under consideration for publication elsewhere. (Conference papers may only be submitted if the paper has been completely re-written and if appropriate written permissions have been obtained from any copyright holders of the original paper). 

All papers are refereed through a peer review process. 

All papers must be submitted online. To submit a paper, please read our  Submitting articles  page.  

Important Dates 

Submission system opens: December 2021 

Submission deadline: 31st March 2022 

All papers accepted by: September 2022 

Scheduled issue: 17.1, 2023 

References: 

Abdullah, M. N. (2020). Family Entrepreneurship and Banking Support in Kuwait: Conventional vs Islamic Banks. Journal of Family Business Management. In press. 

Dana, L.P. & Dana, T.E. (2005), Expanding the Scope of Methodologies Used in Entrepreneurship Research, International Journal of Entrepreneurship & Small Business, 2 (1), 79-88.  

Dana, L.P. & Dumez, H. (2015), Qualitative Research Revisited: Epistemology of a Comprehensive Approach, International Journal of Entrepreneurship & Small Business, 26 (2), 154-170.  

Dana, L-P, Palalic, R. and Ramadani, V. (2021). Entrepreneurship in the Gulf Cooperation Council Region: Evolution and Future Perspectives, New York, World Scientific. 

Dana, L.P., Etemad, H., and Wright, R.W. (2000). The Global Reach of Symbiotic Networks, Journal of Euromarketing, 9(2), pp. 1–16.  

 Lalond, J.F. (2013). Cultural Determinants of Arab Entrepreneurship: An Ethnographic Perspective, Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, 7(3), pp. 213–232. 

Biygautane, M. (2015). ‘Analysis of the Impact of the Cultural and Institutional Characteristics of the Gulf Cooperation Council States in Entrepreneurship: Opportunities and Challenges’, in Kaufmann, H.R. (ed.), Entrepreneurial Challenges in the 21st Century: Creating Stakeholder Value Co-Creation, Palgrave MacMillan, UK, pp. 222–234.  

Ramadani, V., Palalic, R., Dana, L-P. and Bico, A. (20121). Entrepreneurship in Kuwait. In Dana et al. (Eds). Entrepreneurship in the Gulf Cooperation Council Region: Evolution and Future Perspectives, New York, World Scientific. 

Saleh, Y. (2020). ICT, social media and Covid-19: Evidence from informal home-based business community in Kuwait City. Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy. In Press.