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Advances in HRD practices: optimism and sustainability


Special issue call for papers from European Journal of Training and Development

Special Issue Call for Papers from European Journal of Training and Development
Advances in HRD practices: optimism and sustainability

Guest Editors:

Dr. R Raman - director@sibmpune.edu.in
SIBM Pune, India

Dr. Anugamini P Srivastava - anugaminipriyasrivastava@sibmpune.edu.in
SIBM Pune, India

Dr. Shailesh Rastogi - shaileshrastogi@sibmpune.edu.in
SIBM Pune, India

Topicality:

Learning is considered as the key to organizational success, and training and development as a crucial tool for creation of learning intentions and development orientation. Efforts are being made to integrate training and development related HRD practices with sustainability of HR practices.
The aim of the special issue is to extend the theoretical and practical understanding of HRD practices for organizational sustainability and to connect it to optimistic behavior or beliefs of employees. Specifically, the objectives of this issue are to evaluate the theoretical underpinnings of the sustainable HRD practices, comprehend the potential antecedents and precedents that influence sustainable HRD practices, recognize the probable outcomes of the sustainable learning, training and development and predict the future agendas for sustainable HRD practices.
Sustainability is a broad and undefined concept. It comprises innumerable environmental, human, social and political– economic aspects into a comprehensible analysis of the 21st century, global society and political-economy (Scully-Russ, 2012). Initially, the sustainability was associated to HRM practices, though later the focus was given to specifically HRD practices, to improve learning oriented researches. A few studies focused on the ‘Theory of risk society’, which was based on the three propositions/model- strategic HRD, critical HRD, and Holistic HRD, to present mutually co-constructive association between HRD and sustainability. Although addressing these models would provide novel and strong conceptual and ethical frameworks to meet the long standing dilemma in the stream, only a few studies were conducted comprising these models of HRD.
Another approach is derived from ‘ideology’ framework (Giroux 2011). It was proposed that mental models have important role in affecting HRD practices and help practitioners to navigate the challenges faced by the organization. It simply depends upon the ideology of the practitioners that influence the limit of sustainability (Swanson and Holton 2001).
Learning is considered as the key to organizational success, and training and development as a crucial tool for creation of learning intentions and development orientation. Efforts are being made to integrate training and development related HRD practices with sustainability of HR practices.
The aim of the special issue is to extend the theoretical and practical understanding of HRD practices for organizational sustainability and to connect it to optimistic behavior or beliefs of employees. Specifically, the objectives of this issue are to evaluate the theoretical underpinnings of the sustainable HRD practices, comprehend the potential antecedents and precedents that influence sustainable HRD practices, recognize the probable outcomes of the sustainable learning, training and development and predict the future agendas for sustainable HRD practices.
Sustainability is a broad and undefined concept. It comprises innumerable environmental, human, social and political– economic aspects into a comprehensible analysis of the 21st century, global society and political-economy (Scully-Russ, 2012). Initially, the sustainability was associated to HRM practices, though later the focus was given to specifically HRD practices, to improve learning oriented researches. A few studies focused on the ‘Theory of risk society’, which was based on the three propositions/model- strategic HRD, critical HRD, and Holistic HRD, to present mutually co-constructive association between HRD and sustainability. Although addressing these models would provide novel and strong conceptual and ethical frameworks to meet the long standing dilemma in the stream, only a few studies were conducted comprising these models of HRD.
Another approach is derived from ‘ideology’ framework (Giroux 2011). It was proposed that mental models have important role in affecting HRD practices and help practitioners to navigate the challenges faced by the organization. It simply depends upon the ideology of the practitioners that influence the limit of sustainability (Swanson and Holton 2001).
 Third perspective was logic of ‘modernity’. This approach put forth that the modern rationality and their orientation towards unconstrained growth affect the political, social, and environmental status of the world (Kuchinke 2010). This aims to call for developmental change in the modern mode of working (Giddens 1994; Korten 2010).
Recent perspective proposed is the ‘eco-consciousness’ integrated with new values and epistemology (O’Sullivan and Taylor 2004). This approach believed that human learning and development is the key goal of a productive human activity (Fenwick 2005). Social and economic concerns are subordinated to it as consciousness has a dominating effect on the way an individual thinks and behave in the organization. It requires practitioners to focus on real world pressures and confront and defy the sustainability agenda (Schumacher 1973).
Individual attitude plays a fundamental role in instilling their behavior. The more optimistic it is; the more positive behavior they exhibit. Studies have acknowledged the relevance of optimism i.e. “the extent to which people hold generalized favorable expectancies for their future” (Carver, 2014), towards employee commitment, performance and stress. When an individual sense higher level of optimism, they tend to feel more confident, less stress, and performance oriented to work with higher commitment and efficiency. Such behavior not only benefits the organization, but also enables individuals to believe in self and others. This could also lead to collective efficacy, higher level of learnings and experience and long term sustainability through infusion of trust in organizational culture. In this aspect, scholars provided an extension of strategic HRM and suggested to test individual and organizational factors towards sustainable HRD. Similarly, optimism in employees and its association with sustainable HRD is in nascent stage.

Originality:

The issue seeks manuscripts that will add value, insights and opinions on the literature of optimism and sustainable HRD in developing nations. The connection between optimism and sustainability has been acknowledged by the scholars, though, how and to what extent optimism can lead to sustainable HRD require more exploration. Similarly, industry and country specific studies are less in number and require developing nation scholars to come up with context specific solutions to ensure sustainable HRM. Therefore, this special issue will invite scholars to provide their optimistic approach to make HRD sustainable in organizations. It would enable convergence of academics and HR practitioners to identify different perspectives of advancement in strategic HRD via sustainable HR and elaborate steps to foster sustainable HRM in organizations.

Themes:

•    Scale development/ construct development
•    Optimism and HRD practices
•    Optimism and attitudes towards Training and development practices
•    Optimism and learning
•    Optimism and sustainable HRD
•    Curvilinear analysis of optimism.
•    Optimism and sustainability
•    HRD practices, attitudes, and sustainability
•    HRD and sustainable competitive advantage
•    Sustainable HRD in service sectors
•    Sustainable HRD of educational institution
•    Multilevel analysis on sustainability
•    HRD sustainability and financial performance.
•    HRD sustainability and effective scale of operations.
•    HRD sustainability and Marketing excellence.
•    And any other related topics

Submission and deadlines:

All submissions to be made via the European Journal of Training and Development Scholar One manuscript submission system http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/ejtd. Author guidelines for the journal can be found here.
The deadline for submissions is July 31st 2019