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Intersectionality and Entrepreneurship


Special issue call for papers from International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research

Special Issue of International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behaviour and Research on

Intersectionality and Entrepreneurship


Guest Editors:
Dr Amal Abbas, Cairo University
Dr Janice Byrne, IESEG School of Management, Paris
Professor Laura Galloway, Heriot-Watt University
Laura Jackman, Heriot-Watt University
Dr Isla Kapasi, University of Leeds


The sophistication of our understanding of the diversity of entrepreneurial experience is growing, and this call seeks to develop some of the emerging areas of interest. In particular, the special issue seeks to attract papers on intersectionality and entrepreneurship as a research topic.  The concept of intersectionality highlights the complexity of social identity, and recognizes the overlap and blurring of identities that may occur. Since the seminal work of Crenshaw (1989) and Hill Collins’ (2000) on the experiences of black women, researchers have explored multiple social identities – gender, race, social class, ethnicity, nationality, sexual orientation, religion, age, disability -  and how they intersect and overlap to create a whole identity. Research efforts that embrace intersectionality reveal interconnections among systems of oppression and the implications they have for how individuals experience disadvantage.

 
Entrepreneurship is a highly democratic activity (Pavey, 2006), characterised by “dynamism, ambiguity, discontinuity, uniqueness and innovation” (Howarth et al, 2005, p.25).  Its potential for ‘emancipation’ has been emphasized (Rindova et al, 2009).  Since anyone can trade, on face value, anyone can be an entrepreneur. The opportunity to work for oneself can represent an opportunity to engage with an employment mode that suits particular life circumstances, or might afford an (entrepreneurial) identity more attractive than other work-based identities. However, whiteness and masculinity continue to provide intangible resources to entrepreneurial legitimacy (Martinez Dy, et al., 2016).  While studies of entrepreneurial diversity are increasing, to date, there has been little engagement with the challenges of intersectionality as a focus of study, nor on the experiences of entrepreneurs for whom intersecting identities form their everyday reality.  In addition, most studies addressing entrepreneurial diversity, as for entrepreneurship generally, focus on the experiences in Western contexts.


So rather than seeking universal explanations for entrepreneurship, this special issue seeks papers that focus on the uniqueness of the venturing experience. This might include inspection of the motivations, experiences and challenges faced by those who operate ventures in the social world they inhabit, and indeed, those who may challenge that social world and its structures by becoming entrepreneurs and by the way they operate their firms.


Papers on definitions of value and success for different groups are welcome, as are papers on entrepreneurship as differently experienced depending on social class, wealth (and poverty) status, race, location in the world. Papers on the effects of national, social and religious cultures in terms of whether to venture, the experiences of those who do, and the outcomes for entrepreneurs and their ventures would also be revealing. Additionally, parenthood and family might be further explored when investigating the intersection of class/gender/ethnicity etc and the experiences of entrepreneurs. This group of potential topics is not exhaustive, and we welcome alternative interpretations and perspectives on intersectionality as it affects and is affected by entrepreneurship.

It is anticipated that this special issue will attract papers based on qualitative studies. We do not seek to exclude quantitative studies and welcome their inclusion, but in terms of exploring intersectionality and entrepreneurship the how and why questions emerge. Increasingly studies of identity are underpinned by the notion that identity is performed and understood as narratives. These narratives emerge not only amongst individuals as they shape and construct their identities, but also by cultures, structures and societies as they shape and categorise the human experience. It is within these contexts that we all live and this special issue seeks to explore the extent to which dominant narratives about the lives of – for example women – affect behaviour and experiences. There is also opportunity to inspect if entrepreneurship challenges or reproduces these narratives.

Submission Guidelines
: We invite both theoretical and empirical papers that explore the institutional context and their outcomes. All submissions are subject to the standard double-blind review process. Manuscripts must be original, unpublished works not concurrently under review for publication at another outlet and are expected to follow the standard formatting guidelines for the journal. Submission must be made through the ScholarOne site at http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/ijebr  by 17th December 2017. Submissions should be prepared according to the Author Guidelines found at http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=ijebr. When submitting your manuscript, please ensure you select this special issue from the relevant drop down menu on page four of the submission process. Reviews, drafts and outcomes will be conducted through early to mid-2018, with publication for those accepted expected to be early 2019.

Initial queries can be directed towards any of the guest editors on the following email addresses:

Dr Amal Abbas                 amal.abbas@foc.cu.edu.eg
Dr Janice Byrne                j.byrne@ieseg.fr
Professor Laura Galloway        l.galloway@hw.ac.uk
Laura Jackman                 l.jackman@hw.ac.uk
Dr Isla Kapasi                i.kapasi@leeds.ac.uk